My Favourite Planet - the online travel guide
 
MFP People
 
  People home
Ancient Greek
artists
 
  1     Home

Sculptors

2     A - D

3     E - H

4     I - M

5     N - P

6     R - Z

Potters /
vase painters


7     A - D

8     E - H

9     I - M

10   N - S


11   Painters

12   Mosaicists

13   Architects

14   Bibliography

 
My Favourite
Planet guides
 
  contents
contributors
impressum
sitemap
 
Places on My Favourite Planet
England
  Avebury
Greece
  Agios Efstratios
Alexandroupoli
Athens
Kastellorizo
Kavala
Patmos
Pella
Polygyros
Psara
Samos
Samothraki
Stageira &
Olympiada
Veria
Turkey
  Istanbul
Ephesus
Kuşadası
Selçuk
Pergamon
 
My Favourite
Planet Blogs
 

The Cheshire Cat Blog - travel articles, photo essays and videos at My Favourite Planet Blogs

Cheshire Cat
Blog
 

Edwin Drood's Column - the blog by The Mysterious Edwin Drood at My Favourite Planet Blogs

Edwin Drood's
Column
 
 

Guide to Planet Earth at My Favourite Planet

Guide to
Planet Earth
Visit the My Favourite Planet Group page on Facebook
  My Favourite Planet, the online travel guide  
home   places   galleries   news   about   contribute   contact   blogs
My Favourite Planet > English > People > Ancient Greek artists
MFP People Ancient Greek artists – page 1 Page 1 of 14
 

Ancient Greek artists

Version 002, March 2020.

Last updated 15 March 2020.

A work in progress - see introduction below
 
Contents
 
This section has grown too large for a single webpage
and has now been reorganized into 14 pages.

page 1     Contents, introduction and index

page 2      Sculptors A - D

page 3      Sculptors E - H

page 4      Sculptors I - M

page 5      Sculptors N - P

page 6      Sculptors R - Z

page 7      Potters / vase painters A - D

page 8      Potters / vase painters E - H

page 9      Potters / vase painters I - M

page 10    Potters / vase painters N - S

page 11    Painters

page 12    Mosaic artists

page 13    Architects

page 14    Bibliography Authors and works cited
On this page:

Introduction

Index of Artists
 

As ever, comments, criticisms, suggestions
and contributions to this project are welcome.

Please get in contact.
 
Ancient Greek
artists
Introduction  
Ancient Greek artists – a work in progress
 

Although there is an abundance of ancient Greek pottery in world museums and collections, very few original sculptures, paintings or mosaics by ancient Greek artists have survived, and most works are known from Roman period copies. The artists seldom signed their works, and many signatures on statues and bases are questionable or were later forgeries.

Several ancient writers, including Pausanias, Plutarch, Pliny the Elder and Lucian of Samosata, mention artworks and name artists who were presumably well-known to the educated readers of their time, but many remain a puzzle to modern scholars. Since the Renaissance historians and archaeologists have attempted to identify the makers and origins of extant works of art, often causing a great deal of debate and controversy in the academic world.

The arrangements of book, chapter and section of the works of ancient authors varies in different modern published editions and online versions. We shall attempt, where possible, to refer to a single source for each author and provide links to the respective passages online.

We will also provide links to information and images of artists and works on this and other websites, as well as bibliographic details for modern publications. As a start, see page 11, Bibliography.
 
Ancient Greek pottery
 

Because of the large numbers of surviving ancient Greek "vases", discovered and collected since at least the 15th century across an enormous geographical area (from across Europe, all around the Mediterranean and into Central Asia), the subject has been studied and written about by many scholars. It is therefore not surprising that there are many theories and a lot of specialized terminology and jargon, which we are unable to deal with in detail here.

Pottery has been described as "indestructable" - at least the baked clay substance - but most often only shards or smashed ancient ceramic objects have been found, and where possible fragments have been carefully restored. Still, it is surprising how many have remained intact, usually those buried as grave goods or as votive offerings to deities, or even deliberately hidden with other objects (coins, valuables, statues, etc) in stashes at times of crisis by owners who believed they may return to recover their possessions. Many pots have astoundingly retained their lustre, colours and painted details over thousands of years. In Sicilian archaeological museums such as Catania, Syracuse, Gela and Argigento, for example, the vast majority of exhibits are vases, many in excellent condition.

Pottery has been made and traded since Neolithic times, for basic daily use, special communal and religious functions, as jewellery and decoration, and for pleasure. From the basic shapes of early ceramics, makers experimented to produce particular forms for practical and aesthetic purposes. Apart from vessels for storage, eating and drinking, there were also ceramic plaques, tiles, bricks, beads, toys, statues, figurines and reliefs (see, for example, a painted Corinthian ceramic pinax, 630-610 BC, and a Campana plaque, 1st century AD). Decoration also evolved from simple indents and grooves made with fingers and thumbs and incisions scratched with sticks, to exquisitely drawn, painted and glazed works of art.

However, since the field of ceramic objects in general is so vast, many scholars of ancient Greek pottery confine themselves to the "vases", which include vessels such as amphorae and kraters (there are over 24 main basic shapes with numerous variations). The continuity of development in form and decoration of Greek pottery can now be charted, particularly from the Archaic period (8th - 5th centuries BC) onwards, and especially in the case "Attic" pottery from Athens, much of which was made for export around the Mediterranean.

Unlike sculptors, painters and architects, potters and vase painters were not named or praised by ancient authors. A small number of vases were signed by the potter, the painter or both, so that those responsible for unsigned pots can sometimes be identified by examining style, form, materials and finish in comparison to signed vessels. In the case where a painter's name is unknown, a name is often given by scholars based on personal idiosyncrasies evident in one or more pieces, the potter for whom they worked (e.g. the Sosias Painter, who worked for Sosias the potter), the current location of an exemplary work (in a collection or museum, for example the Berlin Painter) or a particular subject (e.g. Orpheus Painter). This system was devised by the Oxford-based scholar Sir John Davidson Beazley (1885-1970), who identified around 500 potters, vase painters, groups, and workshops. The key pottery vessel from which the name of the painter has been identified is known as the "name vase".

A name given by scholars to an unidentified artist in any medium is often referred to as the "Notname" (provisional name), from the German word Not, meaning emergency.

The identification of the date and place of manufacture of ceramics is based mainly on the types of clay and decorative materials (e.g. colours) used, the forms of the objects and the kinds of decoration. From the Archaic period vases were produced commercially in great numbers, especially in Corinth, Athens and Magna Graecia (southern Italy). Particular types of images and motifs were apparently popular among painters and customers in various areas at different periods.

Figural subjects included mythological and religious themes, as well as scenes of religious ritual, marriages, funerals, sport, war, theatrical performances and various aspects of daily life. Many images are detailed, graphic and sometimes dramatic, while others are more general and to the modern observer vague. A vast number of vase paintings appear to us more prosaic, mass-produced stock images of heads of humans or horses, standing or seated figures and similar isolated subjects. Although the significance of these is mostly lost on us today, they provide experts with valuable evidence concerning potters and painters, as well as trends in taste and production. Having studied thousands of such vases, the classical pottery expert Arthur Dale Trendall, paraphrasing Mary Tudor, complained, "when I die, they will find, engraved on my heart, 'two draped youths'." *

* D. Williams, Dale Trendall: The eye of an eagle, BICS 41, 1996, page 16. Quoted by Michael Turner, The Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, in his review of Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Deutschland, Band 76, 1. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2005.08.30.

The Thinker, a Neolithic ceramic figurine from Karditsa, Thessaly at My Favourite Planet

"The Thinker", a solid ceramic
figurine of a seated man.

From the area of Karditsa, Thessaly,
central Greece. Final Neolithic period,
4500-3300 BC.

National Archaeological Museum,
Athens. Inv. No. 5894.
 

The head of a marble Cycladic statue from Amorgos at My Favourite Planet

The head of a marble Cycladic statue,
with painted eyes and four red vertical
striations on the left cheek.

Found on the island of Amorgos, Cyclades.
Early Cycladic II period (Keros-Syros
Culture), 2800-2300 BC. Parian marble.

National Archaeological Museum,
Athens. Inv. No. 3909.
 

The kouros statue from the grave of Kroisos at My Favourite Planet

A marble statue of a kouros
from a funerary monument.

Archaic period, around 530 BC. Found
in Anavyssos, Attica. Pentelic marble.

The epigram inscribed on the base of the
statue states that it stood on the grave
of Kroisos (Κροίσος) who died in war.

"Stop and mourn at the grave of dead
Kroisos, whom the raging Ares destroyed
when he fought among the defenders."

The statue was stolen and taken to
France, and returned to Greece in 1937.

National Archaeological Museum,
Athens. Inv. No. 3851.
 

Greek gold foil relief of a round dance, 7th century BC at My Favourite Planet

Greek gold foil relief of a round dance. 7th century BC.

Altes Museum, Berlin.
 
Ancient Greek
artists
Index of artists  
Sculptors
 
Sculptors A - D

Adymos of Veroea

Aetion (of Amphipolis)

Ageladas of Argos

Agesander of Rhodes

Agorakritos of Paros

Alexandros of Antioch

Alkamenes

Alxenor

Anaxagoras of Aegina

Androsthenes

Antenor

Antiphanes of Argos

Archelaos of Priene

Archermos of Chios

Aristion of Paros

Aristokles

Aristokles of Kydonia

Aristokles of Sikyon

Aristokles, son of Kleoetas

Askaros of Thebes

Bathykles of Magnesia

Bryaxis

Chares of Lindos

Daidalos

Daidalos of Sikyon

Damatrios

Damophon

Demetrios of Alopece

Diogenes of Athens

Dipoenos and Skyllis
Sculptors E - H

Endoios

Euphron

Euphranor of Corinth

Euthykartides

Evandros of Veroea

Glaukias of Aegina

Glykon of Athens

Gorgias

Hegesias

Hegias of Athens or Hegesias

Heliodoros of Rhodes

Hephaistos

Hermippos

Herophon
Sculptors I - M

Iktinos

Kalamis

Kallikrates

Kallimachos

Kallon of Aegina

Kallon of Elis

Kanachos of Sikyon (the Elder)

Kanachos of Sikyon (the Younger)

Kephisodotos the Elder

Kephisodotos the Younger

Klearchos of Rhegion

Kresilas

Kritios

Leochares

Lykios

Lysippos

Lysistratos of Sikyon

Lysos

Melas of Chios

Menas of Pergamon

Menekrates

Menestratos (of Athens)

Menestratos of Pergamon

Mikon of Syracuse

Mnesikles

Myron
 
Sculptors N - P

Naukydes of Argos

Nesiotes

Onatas of Aegina

Paionios of Mende

Pasiteles

Pheidias

Philon, son of Emporion

Polyeuktos

Polykleitos the Elder

Polykleitos the Younger

Polykleitos, son of Mothonos

Polykles

Polymedes of Argos

Praxias and Androsthenes

Praxiteles

Pyrrhos of Athens

Pythagoras of Rhegion

Pythagoras of Samos

Pythokritos of Rhodes
Sculptors R - Z

Rhoikos of Samos

Skopas

Sokrates

Sthennis

Strongylion

Styppax

Theodoros of Samos

Thrasymedes of Paros

Timarchos

Timotheos

Zenodoros
 
 
Potters / vase painters
 
Potters / vase painters A - D

Amasis

Antimenes Painter

Aristonothos

Asteas

Berlin Painter

Boreas Painter

Brygos

Brygos Painter

Choregos Painter

Christie Painter

Cock Group

Darius Painter

Diphilos

Dodwell Painter

Dolon Painter
Potters / vase painters E - H

Eucharides Painter

Euphronios

Exekias

Foundry Painter

Gela Painter

Hermonax
 
Potters / vase painters I - M

Iliupersis Painter

Lycurgus Painter

Lydos

Lydos "the slave"

Micali Painter

Mykonos Painter
Potters / vase painters N - S

Nessos Painter

Orpheus Painter

Polygnotos

Polyphemos Painter

Pourtalès Painter

Psiax

Sophilos

Sophilos

Sosias Painter

Syleus Painter

Syriskos Painter

Swing Painter
 
Painters Mosaic artists Architects
 
Aetion (of Amphipolis)

Apelles

Aristeides of Thebes

Euphranor of Corinth

Helena of Egypt

Mikon the Elder of Athens

Mikon the Younger

Nikias

Panainos

Philoxenos of Eretria

Protogenes

Pythagoras of Samos

Sokrates

Turpilius

Zeuxis
Amiteion

Dioskourides of Samos

Gnoseis

Hephaistion

Sosos

Zosimos
Chersiphron

Deinokrates (or Stasikrates)

Hermodoros of Salamis

Iktinos

Mnesikles

Paionios of Ephesus

Philon of Eleusis

Polykleitos

Pytheos

Skopas
Photos and articles © David John, except where otherwise specified.
My Favourite Planet Group page on Facebook

Visit the My Favourite Planet Group on Facebook.

Join the group, write a message or comment,
post photos and videos, start a discussion...
< My Favourite Planet People main page  
 
 
 
 
Vyzantino Greek Restaurant, Plaka, Athens, Greece
 
NEWGEN Travel Agency, Athens, Greece
 
Hotel Orestias Kastorias Thessaloniki, Greece - The heart of hospitality beats at the heart of the city
 
Big Dino's Galini, self-catering beach hotel, Nea Vrasna, Macedonia, Greece
 
Hotel Liotopi, Olympiada, Halkidiki, Macedonia, Greece
 
Hotel Germany, Olympiada, Halkidiki, Macedonia, Greece
 
Hotel Okeanis, Kavala, Macedonia, Greece
 

George Alvanos

rooms
in Kavala's historic Panagia District

Anthemiou 35,
Kavala, Greece

kavalarooms.gr
 
 

Olive Garden Restaurant

Kastellorizo,
Greece

+30 22460 49 109

kastellorizo.de
 
 

Papoutsis
Travel Agency

Kastellorizo,
Greece

+30 22460 49 286

greeklodgings.gr
 
 
Copyright © 2003-2020 My Favourite Planet  |  contributors  |  impressum  |  contents  |  sitemap
my-favourite-planet.com   website design by Ursa Major Design